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Bilder, D, Irvine KD.  2017.  Taking Stock of the Drosophila Research Ecosystem.. Genetics. 206:1227-1236. Abstract
With a century-old history of fundamental discoveries, the fruit fly has long been a favored experimental organism for a wide range of scientific inquiries. But Drosophila is not a "legacy" model organism; technical and intellectual innovations continue to revitalize fly research and drive advances in our understanding of conserved mechanisms of animal biology. Here, we provide an overview of this "ecosystem" and discuss how to address emerging challenges to ensure its continued productivity. Drosophila researchers are fortunate to have a sophisticated and ever-growing toolkit for the analysis of gene function. Access to these tools depends upon continued support for both physical and informational resources. Uncertainty regarding stable support for bioinformatic databases is a particular concern, at a time when there is the need to make the vast knowledge of functional biology provided by this model animal accessible to scientists studying other organisms. Communication and advocacy efforts will promote appreciation of the value of the fly in delivering biomedically important insights. Well-tended traditions of large-scale tool development, open sharing of reagents, and community engagement provide a strong basis for coordinated and proactive initiatives to improve the fly research ecosystem. Overall, there has never been a better time to be a fly pusher.
Li, Y, Harris L, Dooner HK.  2013.  TED, an autonomous and rare maize transposon of the mutator superfamily with a high gametophytic excision frequency.. The Plant cell. 25(9):3251-65. Abstract
Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor.
Ibar, C, Kirichenko E, Keepers B, Enners E, Fleisch K, Irvine KD.  2018.  Tension-dependent regulation of mammalian Hippo signaling through LIMD1.. J Cell Sci. 131:jcs214700. Abstract
Hippo signaling is regulated by biochemical and biomechanical cues that influence the cytoskeleton, but the mechanisms that mediate this have remained unclear. We show that all three mammalian Ajuba family proteins - AJUBA, LIMD1 and WTIP - exhibit tension-dependent localization to adherens junctions, and that both LATS family proteins, LATS1 and LATS2, exhibit an overlapping tension-dependent junctional localization. This localization of Ajuba and LATS family proteins is also influenced by cell density, and by Rho activation. We establish that junctional localization of LATS kinases requires LIMD1, and that LIMD1 is also specifically required for the regulation of LATS kinases and YAP1 by Rho. Our results identify a biomechanical pathway that contributes to regulation of mammalian Hippo signaling, establish that this occurs through tension-dependent LIMD1-mediated recruitment and inhibition of LATS kinases in junctional complexes, and identify roles for this pathway in both Rho-mediated and density-dependent regulation of Hippo signaling.
Dooner, HK, Weil CF.  2013.  Transposons and gene creation. Molecular Genetics and Epigenetics of Plant Transposons. :143-167.