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Miclaus, M, Wu Y, Xu J, Dooner HK, Messing J.  2011.  The maize high-lysine mutant opaque7 is defective in an acyl-CoA synthetase-like protein.. Genetics. 189:1271-1280.
Irvine, KD, Shraiman BI.  2017.  Mechanical control of growth: ideas, facts and challenges.. Development. 144:4238-4248. Abstract
In his classic book On Growth and Form, D'Arcy Thompson discussed the necessity of a physical and mathematical approach to understanding the relationship between growth and form. The past century has seen extraordinary advances in our understanding of biological components and processes contributing to organismal morphogenesis, but the mathematical and physical principles involved have not received comparable attention. The most obvious entry of physics into morphogenesis is via tissue mechanics. In this Review, we discuss the fundamental role of mechanical interactions between cells induced by growth in shaping a tissue. Non-uniform growth can lead to accumulation of mechanical stress, which in the context of two-dimensional sheets of tissue can specify the shape it assumes in three dimensions. A special class of growth patterns - conformal growth - does not lead to the accumulation of stress and can generate a rich variety of planar tissue shapes. Conversely, mechanical stress can provide a regulatory feedback signal into the growth control circuit. Both theory and experiment support a key role for mechanical interactions in shaping tissues and, via mechanical feedback, controlling epithelial growth.
Krishnan, A, Kumaraswamy GK, Vinyard DJ, Gu H, Ananyev GM, Posewitz MZ, Dismukes GC.  2015.  Metabolic and photosynthetic consequences of blocking starch biosynthesis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii sta6 mutant.. Plant J. 81(6):947-960. Abstract
Upon nutrient deprivation, microalgae partition photosynthate into starch and lipids at the expense of protein synthesis and growth. We investigated the role of starch biosynthesis with respect to photosynthetic growth and carbon partitioning in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii starchless mutant, sta6, which lacks ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. This mutant is unable to convert glucose-1-phosphate to ADP-glucose, the precursor of starch biosynthesis. During nutrient-replete culturing, sta6 does not re-direct metabolism to make more proteins or lipids, and accumulates 20% less biomass. The underlying molecular basis for the decreased biomass phenotype was identified using LC-MS metabolomics studies and flux methods. Above a threshold light intensity, photosynthetic electron transport rates (water → CO2) decrease in sta6 due to attenuated rates of NADPH re-oxidation, without affecting photosystems I or II (no change in isolated photosynthetic electron transport). We observed large accumulations of carbon metabolites that are precursors for the biosynthesis of lipids, amino acids and sugars/starch, indicating system-wide consequences of slower NADPH re-oxidation. Attenuated carbon fixation resulted in imbalances in both redox and adenylate energy. The pool sizes of both pyridine and adenylate nucleotides in sta6 increased substantially to compensate for the slower rate of turnover. Mitochondrial respiration partially relieved the reductant stress; however, prolonged high-light exposure caused accelerated photoinhibition. Thus, starch biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas plays a critical role as a principal carbon sink influencing cellular energy balance however, disrupting starch biosynthesis does not redirect resources to other bioproducts (lipids or proteins) during nutrient-replete culturing, resulting in cells that are susceptible to photochemical damage caused by redox stress.
Wang, W, Wu Y, Messing J.  2012.  The mitochondrial genome of an aquatic plant, Spirodela polyrhiza. PloS one. 7:e46747. AbstractWebsite
BACKGROUND: Spirodela polyrhiza is a species of the order Alismatales, which represent the basal lineage of monocots with more ancestral features than the Poales. Its complete sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome could provide clues for the understanding of the evolution of mt genomes in plant. METHODS: Spirodela polyrhiza mt genome was sequenced from total genomic DNA without physical separation of chloroplast and nuclear DNA using the SOLiD platform. Using a genome copy number sensitive assembly algorithm, the mt genome was successfully assembled. Gap closure and accuracy was determined with PCR products sequenced with the dideoxy method. CONCLUSIONS: This is the most compact monocot mitochondrial genome with 228,493 bp. A total of 57 genes encode 35 known proteins, 3 ribosomal RNAs, and 19 tRNAs that recognize 15 amino acids. There are about 600 RNA editing sites predicted and three lineage specific protein-coding-gene losses. The mitochondrial genes, pseudogenes, and other hypothetical genes (ORFs) cover 71,783 bp (31.0%) of the genome. Imported plastid DNA accounts for an additional 9,295 bp (4.1%) of the mitochondrial DNA. Absence of transposable element sequences suggests that very few nuclear sequences have migrated into Spirodela mtDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved protein-coding genes suggests that Spirodela shares the common ancestor with other monocots, but there is no obvious synteny between Spirodela and rice mtDNAs. After eliminating genes, introns, ORFs, and plastid-derived DNA, nearly four-fifths of the Spirodela mitochondrial genome is of unknown origin and function. Although it contains a similar chloroplast DNA content and range of RNA editing as other monocots, it is void of nuclear insertions, active gene loss, and comprises large regions of sequences of unknown origin in non-coding regions. Moreover, the lack of synteny with known mitochondrial genomic sequences shed new light on the early evolution of monocot mitochondrial genomes.