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Dudas, B, Jenes B, Kiss GB, Maliga P.  2012.  Spectinomycin resistance mutations in the rrn16 gene are new plastid markers in Medicago sativa. Theor. Appl. Genet. 125:1517-23. AbstractWebsite
We report here the isolation of spectinomycin-resistant mutants in cultured cells of Medicago sativa line RegenSY-T2. Spectinomycin induces bleaching of cultured alfalfa cells due to inhibition of protein synthesis on the prokaryotic type 70S plastid ribosomes. Spontaneous mutants resistant to spectinomycin bleaching were identified by their ability to form green shoots on plant regeneration medium containing selective spectinomycin concentrations in the range of 25-50 mg/l. Sequencing of the plastid rrn16 gene revealed that spectinomycin resistance is due to mutations in a conserved stem structure of the 16S rRNA. Resistant plants transferred to the greenhouse developed normally and produced spectinomycin-resistant seed progeny. In light of their absence in soybean, a related leguminous plant, the isolation of spectinomycin-resistant mutants in M. sativa was unexpected. The new mutations are useful for the study of plastid inheritance, as demonstrated by detection of predominantly paternal plastid inheritance in the RegenSY-T2 x Szapko57 cross, and can be used as selective markers in plastid transformation vectors to obtain cisgenic plants.
Lutz, KA, Martin C, Khairzada S, Maliga P.  2015.  Steroid-inducible BABY BOOM system for development of fertile Arabidopsis thaliana plants after prolonged tissue culture. Plant Cell Rep. 34:1849-56. AbstractWebsite
KEY MESSAGE: We describe a steroid-inducible BABY BOOM system that improves plant regeneration in Arabidopsis leaf cultures and yields fertile plants. Regeneration of Arabidopsis thaliana plants for extended periods of time in tissue culture may result in sterile plants. We report here a novel approach for A. thaliana regeneration using a regulated system to induce embryogenic cultures from leaf tissue. The system is based on BABY BOOM (BBM), a transcription factor that turns on genes involved in embryogenesis. We transformed the nucleus of A. thaliana plants with BBM:GR, a gene in which the BBM coding region is fused with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) steroid-binding domain. In the absence of the synthetic steroid dexamethasone (DEX), the BBM:GR fusion protein is localized in the cytoplasm. Only when DEX is included in the culture medium does the BBM transcription factor enter the nucleus and turn on genes involved in embryogenesis. BBM:GR plant lines show prolific shoot regeneration from leaf pieces on media containing DEX. Removal of DEX from the culture media allowed for flowering and seed formation. Therefore, use of BBM:GR leaf tissue for regeneration of plants for extended periods of time in tissue culture will facilitate the recovery of fertile plants.
Tungsuchat-Huang, T, Sinagawa-Garcia SR, Paredes-Lopez O, Maliga P.  2010.  Study of plastid genome stability in tobacco reveals that the loss of marker genes is more likely by gene conversion than by recombination between 34-bp loxP repeats. Plant Physiol.. 153:252-9. AbstractWebsite
In transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids, we flank the marker genes with recombinase target sites to facilitate their posttransformation excision. The P1 phage loxP sites are identical 34-bp direct repeats, whereas the phiC31 phage attB/attP sites are 54- and 215-bp sequences with partial homology within the 54-bp region. Deletions in the plastid genome are known to occur by recombination between directly repeated sequences. Our objective was to test whether or not the marker genes may be lost by homologous recombination via the directly repeated target sites in the absence of site-specific recombinases. The sequence between the target sites was the bar(au) gene that causes a golden-yellow (aurea) leaf color, so that the loss of the bar(au) gene can be readily detected by the appearance of green sectors. We report here that transplastomes carrying the bar(au) gene marker between recombinase target sites are relatively stable because no green sectors were detected in approximately 36,000 seedlings (Nt-pSS33 lines) carrying attB/attP-flanked bar(au) gene and in approximately 38,000 seedlings (Nt-pSS42 lines) carrying loxP-flanked bar(au) gene. Exceptions were six uniformly green plants in the Nt-pSS42-7A progeny. Sequencing the region of plastid DNA that may derive from the vector indicated that the bar(au) gene in the six green plants was lost by gene conversion using wild-type plastid DNA as template rather than by deletion via directly repeated loxP sites. Thus, the recombinase target sites incorporated in the plastid genome for marker gene excisions are too short to mediate the loss of marker genes by homologous recombination at a measurable frequency.