Publications

Journal Article
Revyakin, A, Liu C, Ebright RH, Strick TR.  2006.  Abortive initiation and productive initiation by RNA polymerase involve DNA scrunching.. Science (New York, N.Y.). 314(5802):1139-43. Abstract
Using single-molecule DNA nanomanipulation, we show that abortive initiation involves DNA "scrunching"--in which RNA polymerase (RNAP) remains stationary and unwinds and pulls downstream DNA into itself--and that scrunching requires RNA synthesis and depends on RNA length. We show further that promoter escape involves scrunching, and that scrunching occurs in most or all instances of promoter escape. Our results support the existence of an obligatory stressed intermediate, with approximately one turn of additional DNA unwinding, in escape and are consistent with the proposal that stress in this intermediate provides the driving force to break RNAP-promoter and RNAP-initiation-factor interactions in escape.
Lee, N K, Kapanidis AN, Wang Y, Michalet X, Mukhopadhyay J, Ebright RH, Weiss S.  2005.  Accurate FRET measurements within single diffusing biomolecules using alternating-laser excitation.. Biophysical journal. 88(4):2939-53. Abstract
Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a donor (D) and an acceptor (A) at the single-molecule level currently provides qualitative information about distance, and quantitative information about kinetics of distance changes. Here, we used the sorting ability of confocal microscopy equipped with alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) to measure accurate FRET efficiencies and distances from single molecules, using corrections that account for cross-talk terms that contaminate the FRET-induced signal, and for differences in the detection efficiency and quantum yield of the probes. ALEX yields accurate FRET independent of instrumental factors, such as excitation intensity or detector alignment. Using DNA fragments, we showed that ALEX-based distances agree well with predictions from a cylindrical model of DNA; ALEX-based distances fit better to theory than distances obtained at the ensemble level. Distance measurements within transcription complexes agreed well with ensemble-FRET measurements, and with structural models based on ensemble-FRET and x-ray crystallography. ALEX can benefit structural analysis of biomolecules, especially when such molecules are inaccessible to conventional structural methods due to heterogeneity or transient nature.
Tan, Q, Linask KL, Ebright RH, Woychik NA.  2000.  Activation mutants in yeast RNA polymerase II subunit RPB3 provide evidence for a structurally conserved surface required for activation in eukaryotes and bacteria.. Genes & development. 14(3):339-48. Abstract
We have identified a mutant in RPB3, the third-largest subunit of yeast RNA polymerase II, that is defective in activator-dependent transcription, but not defective in activator-independent, basal transcription. The mutant contains two amino-acid substitutions, C92R and A159G, that are both required for pronounced defects in activator-dependent transcription. Synthetic enhancement of phenotypes of C92R and A159G, and of several other pairs of substitutions, is consistent with a functional relationship between residues 92-95 and 159-161. Homology modeling of RPB3 on the basis of the crystallographic structure of alphaNTD indicates that residues 92-95 and 159-162 are likely to be adjacent within the structure of RPB3. In addition, homology modeling indicates that the location of residues 159-162 within RPB3 corresponds to the location of an activation target within alphaNTD (the target of activating region 2 of catabolite activator protein, an activation target involved in a protein-protein interaction that facilitates isomerization of the RNA polymerase promoter closed complex to the RNA polymerase promoter open complex). The apparent finding of a conserved surface required for activation in eukaryotes and bacteria raises the possibility of conserved mechanisms of activation in eukaryotes and bacteria.
Walker, SS, Degen D, Nickbarg E, Carr D, Soriano A, Mandal M B, Painter RE, Sheth PR, Xiao L, Sher X et al..  2017.  Affinity selection-mass spectrometry identifies a novel antibacterial RNA polymerase inhibitor.. ACS Chemical Biology. 12:1346-1352. Abstract
The growing prevalence of drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a significant global threat to human health. Rifampicin, an RNA polymerase-targeting agent, is an important part of the antibacterial armamentarium; however the emergence of resistance requires that it be used against only certain infections and usually in combination with another antibiotic. While rifampicin has significant clinical limitations, it does show that bacterial RNA polymerase can be an effective target for antibacterial intervention. To find new RNA polymerase inhibitors we initiated a screen of a collection of antibacterial bioactive molecules using affinity selection-mass spectrometry and purified Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase (subunits α, β, β', ω). Affinity selection screening identified a novel small molecule, MRL-436, that binds selectively to and inhibits RNA polymerase in vitro and inhibits RNA synthesis in the cell. Selection for resistance followed by whole genome sequencing identified a missense mutation in rpoC (β' subunit) and, separately, frameshift mutations in rpoZ (ω subunit) suggesting that MRL-436 targets RNA polymerase in the cell. In addition, cells lacking the rpoZ gene or purified RNA polymerase containing either a specific substitution in β' or lacking ω are selectively resistant to MRL-436. Molecular modeling indicates that the location of the substitution mutation in β' is closely juxtaposed with ω in a region of the complex thought to be important for transcription regulation during cellular response to amino acid starvation.
Ebright, RH, Le Grice SF, Miller JP, Krakow JS.  1985.  Analogs of cyclic AMP that elicit the biochemically defined conformational change in catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) but do not stimulate binding to DNA.. Journal of molecular biology. 182(1):91-107. Abstract
We have measured the effects on catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) of 22 synthetic analogs of cAMP. Each analog was assayed to test three parameters: (1) binding to CAP; (2) induction of the conformational change in CAP; and (3) activation of transcription. Thus we have identified seven cAMP analogs that bind to CAP as well or better than does cAMP, cause the assayed conformational change in CAP, yet exhibit no ability to activate transcription. We designate these analogs class D. The conformational change elicited in CAP by the class D analogs was further investigated by: (1) sensitivity to the proteolytic enzymes chymotrypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, subtilisin and trypsin; (2) formation of inter-subunit covalent crosslinks by 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid); and (3) degree of labeling of cysteine by [3H]N-ethylmaleimide. These experiments failed to detect a conformational difference between the CAP-class D and CAP-cAMP complexes. Filter binding and nuclease protection experiments indicate that the class D analogs do not efficiently support the binding of CAP to DNA. From these results, we suggest that there exists a hitherto undetected event dependent on cAMP, and required for CAP to bind to DNA. We suggest that this event involves a change that takes place in proximity to the N6 atom of cAMP. Three possible interpretations are discussed.
Maffioli, SI, Zhang Y, Degen D, Carzaniga T, Del Gatto G, Serina S, Monciardini P, Mazzetti C, Guglierame P, Candiani G et al..  2017.  Antibacterial Nucleoside-Analog Inhibitor of Bacterial RNA Polymerase.. Cell. 169(7):1240-1248.e23. Abstract
Drug-resistant bacterial pathogens pose an urgent public-health crisis. Here, we report the discovery, from microbial-extract screening, of a nucleoside-analog inhibitor that inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) and exhibits antibacterial activity against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens: pseudouridimycin (PUM). PUM is a natural product comprising a formamidinylated, N-hydroxylated Gly-Gln dipeptide conjugated to 6'-amino-pseudouridine. PUM potently and selectively inhibits bacterial RNAP in vitro, inhibits bacterial growth in culture, and clears infection in a mouse model of Streptococcus pyogenes peritonitis. PUM inhibits RNAP through a binding site on RNAP (the NTP addition site) and mechanism (competition with UTP for occupancy of the NTP addition site) that differ from those of the RNAP inhibitor and current antibacterial drug rifampin (Rif). PUM exhibits additive antibacterial activity when co-administered with Rif, exhibits no cross-resistance with Rif, and exhibits a spontaneous resistance rate an order-of-magnitude lower than that of Rif. PUM is a highly promising lead for antibacterial therapy.
Mukhopadhyay, J, Sineva E, Knight J, Levy RM, Ebright RH.  2004.  Antibacterial peptide microcin J25 inhibits transcription by binding within and obstructing the RNA polymerase secondary channel.. Molecular cell. 14(6):739-51. Abstract
The antibacterial peptide microcin J25 (MccJ25) inhibits transcription by bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). Biochemical results indicate that inhibition of transcription occurs at the level of NTP uptake or NTP binding by RNAP. Genetic results indicate that inhibition of transcription requires an extensive determinant, comprising more than 50 amino acid residues, within the RNAP secondary channel (also known as the "NTP-uptake channel" or "pore"). Biophysical results indicate that inhibition of transcription involves binding of MccJ25 within the RNAP secondary channel. Molecular modeling indicates that binding of MccJ25 within the RNAP secondary channel obstructs the RNAP secondary channel. We conclude that MccJ25 inhibits transcription by binding within and obstructing the RNAP secondary channel--acting essentially as a "cork in a bottle." Obstruction of the RNAP secondary channel represents an attractive target for drug discovery.
Kuznedelov, K, Semenova E, Knappe TA, Mukhamedyarov D, Srivastava A, Chatterjee S, Ebright RH, Marahiel MA, Severinov K.  2011.  The Antibacterial Threaded-lasso Peptide Capistruin Inhibits Bacterial RNA Polymerase.. Journal of molecular biology. 412(5):842-8. Abstract
Capistruin, a ribosomally synthesized, post-translationally modified peptide produced by Burkholderia thailandensis E264, efficiently inhibits growth of Burkholderia and closely related Pseudomonas strains. The functional target of capistruin is not known. Capistruin is a threaded-lasso peptide (lariat peptide) consisting of an N-terminal ring of nine amino acids and a C-terminal tail of 10 amino acids threaded through the ring. The structure of capistruin is similar to that of microcin J25 (MccJ25), a threaded-lasso antibacterial peptide that is produced by some strains of Escherichia coli and targets DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP). Here, we show that capistruin, like MccJ25, inhibits wild type E. coli RNAP but not mutant, MccJ25-resistant, E. coli RNAP. We show further that an E. coli strain resistant to MccJ25, as a result of a mutation in an RNAP subunit gene, exhibits resistance to capistruin. The results indicate that the structural similarity of capistruin and MccJ25 reflects functional similarity and suggest that the functional target of capistruin, and possibly other threaded-lasso peptides, is bacterial RNAP.
Xiao, Y, Wei X, Ebright R, Wall D.  2011.  Antibiotic production by myxobacteria plays a role in predation.. Journal of bacteriology. 193(18):4626-33. Abstract
Myxobacteria are predatory and are prolific producers of secondary metabolites. Here, we tested a hypothesized role that secondary metabolite antibiotics function as weapons in predation. To test this, a Myxococcus xanthus Δta1 mutant, blocked in antibiotic TA (myxovirescin) production, was constructed. This TA(-) mutant was defective in producing a zone of inhibition (ZOI) against Escherichia coli. This shows that TA is the major M. xanthus-diffusible antibacterial agent against E. coli. Correspondingly, the TA(-) mutant was defective in E. coli killing. Separately, an engineered E. coli strain resistant to TA was shown to be resistant toward predation. Exogenous addition of spectinomycin, a bacteriostatic antibiotic, rescued the predation defect of the TA(-) mutant. In contrast, against Micrococcus luteus the TA(-) mutant exhibited no defect in ZOI or killing. Thus, TA plays a selective role on prey species. To extend these studies to other myxobacteria, the role of antibiotic corallopyronin production in predation was tested and also found to be required for Corallococcus coralloides killing on E. coli. Next, a role of TA production in myxobacterial fitness was assessed by measuring swarm expansion. Here, the TA(-) mutant had a specific swarm rate reduction on prey lawns, and thus reduced fitness, compared to an isogenic TA(+) strain. Based on these observations, we conclude that myxobacterial antibiotic production can function as a predatory weapon. To our knowledge, this is the first report to directly show a link between secondary metabolite production and predation.
Parkinson, G, Gunasekera A, Vojtechovsky J, Zhang X, Kunkel TA, Berman H, Ebright RH.  1996.  Aromatic hydrogen bond in sequence-specific protein DNA recognition.. Nature structural biology. 3(10):837-41.
Chakraborty, A, Wang D, Ebright YW, Ebright RH.  2010.  Azide-specific labeling of biomolecules by Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation phosphine derivatives of fluorescent probes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.. Methods in enzymology. 472:19-30. Abstract
We describe the synthesis of phosphine derivatives of three fluorescent probes that have a brightness and photostability suitable for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy: Alexa488, Cy3B, and Alexa647. In addition, we describe procedures for use of these reagents in azide-specific, bioorthogonal labeling through Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation, as well as procedures for the quantitation of labeling specificity and labeling efficiency. The reagents and procedures of this report enable chemoselective, site-selective labeling of azide-containing biomolecules for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy.
Estrem, ST, Ross W, Gaal T, Chen ZW, Niu W, Ebright RH, Gourse RL.  1999.  Bacterial promoter architecture: subsite structure of UP elements and interactions with the carboxy-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit.. Genes & development. 13(16):2134-47. Abstract
We demonstrate here that the previously described bacterial promoter upstream element (UP element) consists of two distinct subsites, each of which, by itself, can bind the RNA polymerase holoenzyme alpha subunit carboxy-terminal domain (RNAP alphaCTD) and stimulate transcription. Using binding-site-selection experiments, we identify the consensus sequence for each subsite. The selected proximal subsites (positions -46 to -38; consensus 5'-AAAAAARNR-3') stimulate transcription up to 170-fold, and the selected distal subsites (positions -57 to -47; consensus 5'-AWWWWWTTTTT-3') stimulate transcription up to 16-fold. RNAP has subunit composition alpha(2)betabeta'sigma and thus contains two copies of alphaCTD. Experiments with RNAP derivatives containing only one copy of alphaCTD indicate, in contrast to a previous report, that the two alphaCTDs function interchangeably with respect to UP element recognition. Furthermore, function of the consensus proximal subsite requires only one copy of alphaCTD, whereas function of the consensus distal subsite requires both copies of alphaCTD. We propose that each subsite constitutes a binding site for a copy of alphaCTD, and that binding of an alphaCTD to the proximal subsite region (through specific interactions with a consensus proximal subsite or through nonspecific interactions with a nonconsensus proximal subsite) is a prerequisite for binding of the other alphaCTD to the distal subsite.
Minakhin, L, Bhagat S, Brunning A, Campbell EA, Darst SA, Ebright RH, Severinov K.  2001.  Bacterial RNA polymerase subunit omega and eukaryotic RNA polymerase subunit RPB6 are sequence, structural, and functional homologs and promote RNA polymerase assembly.. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 98(3):892-7. Abstract
Bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) has subunit composition beta'betaalpha(I)alpha(II)omega. The role of omega has been unclear. We show that omega is homologous in sequence and structure to RPB6, an essential subunit shared in eukaryotic RNAP I, II, and III. In Escherichia coli, overproduction of omega suppresses the assembly defect caused by substitution of residue 1362 of the largest subunit of RNAP, beta'. In yeast, overproduction of RPB6 suppresses the assembly defect caused by the equivalent substitution in the largest subunit of RNAP II, RPB1. High-resolution structural analysis of the omega-beta' interface in bacterial RNAP, and comparison with the RPB6-RPB1 interface in yeast RNAP II, confirms the structural relationship and suggests a "latching" mechanism for the role of omega and RPB6 in promoting RNAP assembly.
Ebright, RH, Wong JR, Chen LB.  1986.  Binding of 2-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene to estrogen receptors in rat cytosol.. Cancer research. 46(5):2349-51. Abstract
The potent carcinogen 2-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene (2-OH-BP) competes for binding to the estrogen receptor in the cytosol of rat uterus and liver. The dissociation constant (K1) for this interaction is congruent to 2 X 10(-5) M. In contrast, 4-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene does not bind to the estrogen receptor; 1-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, 5-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, 6-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, and 12-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene bind less tightly than does 2-OH-BP. These five chemicals are not carcinogenic. We suggest that the estrogen receptor may mediate the carcinogenic effect of 2-OH-BP or of related chemicals. One possibility is that the receptor might convey 2-OH-BP to specific sites in DNA.
Ebright, RH, Connell ND.  2002.  Bioweapon agents: more access means more risk.. Nature. 415(6870):364.
Heyduk, T, Lee JC, Ebright YW, Blatter EE, Zhou Y, Ebright RH.  1993.  CAP interacts with RNA polymerase in solution in the absence of promoter DNA.. Nature. 364(6437):548-9. Abstract
Protein-protein interactions between transcription activator proteins and RNA polymerase or basal transcription factors have been suggested to be important for transcription activation. Interactions between catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and RNA polymerase have been proposed based on face-of-helix-dependent transcription activation by CAP and based on face-of-helix-dependent cooperative binding of CAP and RNA polymerase to promoter DNA. Mutants of CAP specifically defective in transcription activation have been isolated (mutants defective in transcription activation, but not defective in DNA binding and DNA bending). All such mutants contain amino-acid substitutions within a surface loop consisting of amino acids 152 to 166 of CAP. Here we use the thermodynamically rigorous technique of fluorescence polarization to show that CAP interacts with RNA polymerase in solution in the absence of promoter DNA (KD,app = 2.8 x 10(-7) M), whereas [Ala158]CAP, a mutant of CAP specifically defective in transcription activation, does not.
Lawson, CL, Swigon D, Murakami KS, Darst SA, Berman HM, Ebright RH.  2004.  Catabolite activator protein: DNA binding and transcription activation.. Current opinion in structural biology. 14(1):10-20. Abstract
Recently determined structures of the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP) in complex with DNA, and in complex with the RNA polymerase alpha subunit C-terminal domain (alphaCTD) and DNA, have yielded insights into how CAP binds DNA and activates transcription. Comparison of multiple structures of CAP-DNA complexes has revealed the contributions of direct and indirect readout to DNA binding by CAP. The structure of the CAP-alphaCTD-DNA complex has provided the first structural description of interactions between a transcription activator and its functional target within the general transcription machinery. Using the structure of the CAP-alphaCTD-DNA complex, the structure of an RNA polymerase-DNA complex, and restraints from biophysical, biochemical and genetic experiments, it has been possible to construct detailed three-dimensional models of intact class I and class II transcription activation complexes.
Zhang, X, Zhou Y, Ebright YW, Ebright RH.  1992.  Catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) is not an "acidic activating region" transcription activator protein. Negatively charged amino acids of CAP that are solvent-accessible in the CAP-DNA complex play no role in transcription activation at lac.. The Journal of biological chemistry. 267(12):8136-9. Abstract
It has been suggested that the catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) uses an "acidic activating region" transcription activation mechanism and that Glu171 of CAP is the critical amino acid of the "acidic activating region" of CAP (Irwin, N., and Ptashne, M. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 8315-8319). In this paper, we show, contrary to the previously published report, that substitution of Glu171 of CAP fails to result in a specific defect in transcription activation at the lac promoter. Furthermore, in this paper, we show that substitution of each other negatively charged amino acid of CAP that is solvent-accessible in the CAP-DNA complex fails to result in a specific defect in transcription activation at the lac promoter. We conclude that CAP does not use an acidic activating region transcription activation mechanism in transcription activation at the lac promoter.
Ebright, RH, Beckwith J.  1985.  The catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) is not required for indole-3-acetic acid to activate transcription of the araBAD operon of Escherichia coli K-12.. Molecular & general genetics : MGG. 201(1):51-5. Abstract
Kline et al. (1980) have reported that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and four other indole derivatives are able to substitute for cAMP in activating expression of the ara regulon of E. coli. We have examined this phenomenon in detail, utilizing fusions between the structural gene for beta-galactosidase and the promoters for the araBAD, araE, and araFG operons. We confirm that IAA potently stimulates transcription from the araBAD promoter. The effect is highly specific to araBAD, as IAA has no, or only slight, effects on the araE and araFG operons. However, contrary to the results of Kline et al., we find that the action of IAA does not require CAP. Thus, IAA fully stimulates the transcription of araBAD in a strain which bears a complete deletion of the crp gene.
Niu, W, Zhou Y, Dong Q, Ebright YW, Ebright RH.  1994.  Characterization of the activating region of Escherichia coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP). I. Saturation and alanine-scanning mutagenesis.. Journal of molecular biology. 243(4):595-602. Abstract
It has been proposed that the surface loop consisting of amino acid residues 152 to 166 of the catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli makes direct protein-protein contact with RNA polymerase at the lac promoter. In this work, we have used targeted saturation mutagenesis of codons 152 to 166 of the gene encoding CAP, followed by a screen, to isolate more than 200 independent mutants of CAP defective in transcription activation but not defective in DNA binding. All isolated single-substitution mutants map to just eight amino acid residues; 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 162, 163 and 164. We propose that these residues define the full extent of the epitope on CAP for the proposed CAP-RNA polymerase interaction. In addition, we have constructed alanine substitutions at each position from residue 152 to 166 of CAP, and we have analyzed the effects on transcription activation at the lac promoter and on DNA binding. Alanine substitution of Thr158 results in an approximately eightfold specific defect in transcription activation. In contrast, alanine substitution of no other residue tested results in a more than twofold specific defect in transcription activation. We conclude that, for Thr158, side-chain atoms beyond C beta are essential for transcription activation at the lac promoter, and we propose that Thr158 OH7 gamma makes direct contact with RNA polymerase in the ternary complex of lac promoter, CAP and RNA polymerase. We conclude further that for no residue other than Thr158 are side-chain atoms beyond C beta essential for transcription activation at the lac promoter.
Zhou, Y, Merkel TJ, Ebright RH.  1994.  Characterization of the activating region of Escherichia coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP). II. Role at Class I and class II CAP-dependent promoters.. Journal of molecular biology. 243(4):603-10. Abstract
CAP-dependent promoters can be divided into classes based on the position of the DNA site for CAP. In class I CAP-dependent promoters, the DNA site for CAP is located upstream of the DNA site for polymerase; the DNA site for CAP can be located at various distances from the transcription start point, provided that the DNS site for CAP and the DNA site for RNA polymerase are on the same face of the DNA helix. In class II CAP-dependent promoters, the DNA site for CAP overlaps the DNA site for RNA polymerase, replacing the -35 determinants for binding of RNA polymerase. In previous work, we have shown that a surface loop consisting of amino acid residues 152 to 166 of CAP is essential for transcription activation at the best-characterized class I CAP-dependent promoter, the lac promoter, and we proposed that this surface loop makes direct protein-protein contact with RNA polymerase in the ternary complex of lac promoter, CAP, and RNA polymerase. Here, we show that the surface loop consisting of amino acid residues 152 to 166 is essential for transcription activation at other class I CAP-dependent promoters and at a class II CAP-dependent promoter. We show further that the effects of alanine substitutions of residues 152 to 166 are qualitatively identical at the lac promoter and other class I CAP-dependent promoters, but are different at a class II CAP-dependent promoter. We propose that the surface loop consisting of residues 152 to 166 makes identical molecular interactions in transcription activation at all class I CAP-dependent promoters, irrespective of distance between the DNA site for CAP and the transcription start point, but makes a different set of molecular interactions in transcription activation at class II CAP-dependent promoters.
Ebright, RH, Ebright YW, Gunasekera A.  1989.  Consensus DNA site for the Escherichia coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP): CAP exhibits a 450-fold higher affinity for the consensus DNA site than for the E. coli lac DNA site.. Nucleic acids research. 17(24):10295-305. Abstract
We have synthesized two 40 base pair DNA fragments; one fragment contains the consensus DNA site for CAP (fragment 'ICAP'); the other fragment contains the E. coli lac promoter DNA site for CAP (fragment 'LCAP'). We have investigated the binding of CAP to the two DNA fragments using the nitrocellulose filter binding assay. Under standard conditions [( NaCl] = 200 mM, pH = 7.3), CAP exhibits a 450-fold higher affinity for ICAP than for LCAP. The salt dependence of the binding equilibrium indicates that CAP makes eight ion pairs with ICAP, but only six ion pairs with LCAP. Approximately half of the difference in binding free energy for interaction of CAP with ICAP vs. LCAP is attributable to this difference in ion-pair formation. The pH dependence of the binding equilibrium indicates that the eight CAP-ICAP ion pairs and the six CAP-LCAP ion pairs do not involve His residues of CAP.
Ebright, RH, Ebright YW, Pendergrast PS, Gunasekera A.  1990.  Conversion of a helix-turn-helix motif sequence-specific DNA binding protein into a site-specific DNA cleavage agent.. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 87(8):2882-6. Abstract
Escherichia coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) is a helix-turn-helix motif sequence-specific DNA binding protein [de Crombrugghe, B., Busby, S. & Buc, H. (1984) Science 224, 831-838; and Pabo, C. & Sauer, R. (1984) Annu. Rev. Biochem. 53, 293-321]. In this work, CAP has been converted into a site-specific DNA cleavage agent by incorporation of the chelator 1,10-phenanthroline at amino acid 10 of the helix-turn-helix motif. [(N-Acetyl-5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline)-Cys178]CAP binds to a 22-base-pair DNA recognition site with Kobs = 1 x 10(8) M-1. In the presence of Cu(II) and reducing agent, [(N-acetyl-5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline)-Cys178]CAP cleaves DNA at four adjacent nucleotides on each DNA strand within the DNA recognition site. The DNA cleavage reaction has been demonstrated using 40-base-pair and 7164-base-pair DNA substrates. The DNA cleavage reaction is not inhibited by dam methylation of the DNA substrate. Such semisynthetic site-specific DNA cleavage agents have potential applications in chromosome mapping, cloning, and sequencing.
Ebright, R, Dong Q, Messing J.  1992.  Corrected nucleotide sequence of M13mp18 gene III.. Gene. 114(1):81-3. Abstract
There are seven differences between the actual nucleotide (nt) sequence of bacteriophage M13mp18 gene III and the previously reported nt sequence (which had been compiled based on the nt sequence of wild-type bacteriophage M13 gene III).
Zhang, XP, Gunasekera A, Ebright YW, Ebright RH.  1991.  Derivatives of CAP having no solvent-accessible cysteine residues, or having a unique solvent-accessible cysteine residue at amino acid 2 of the helix-turn-helix motif.. Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics. 9(3):463-73. Abstract
The Escherichia coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) is a helix-turn-helix motif sequence-specific DNA binding protein. CAP contains a unique solvent-accessible cysteine residue at amino acid 10 of the helix-turn-helix motif. In published work, we have constructed a prototype semi-synthetic site-specific DNA cleavage agent from CAP by use of cysteine-specific chemical modification to incorporate a nucleolytic chelator-metal complex at amino acid 10 of the helix-turn-helix motif [Ebright, R., Ebright, Y., Pendergrast, P.S. and Gunasekera, A., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 2882-2886 (1990)]. Construction of second-generation semi-synthetic site-specific DNA cleavage agents from CAP requires the construction of derivatives of CAP having unique solvent-accessible cysteine residues at sites within CAP other than amino acid 10 of the helix-turn-helix motif. In the present work, we have constructed and characterized two derivatives of CAP having no solvent-accessible cysteine residues: [Ser178]CAP and [Leu178]CAP. In addition, in the present work, we have constructed and characterized one derivative of CAP having a unique solvent-accessible cysteine residue at amino acid 2 of the helix-turn-helix motif: [Cys170;Ser178]CAP.