Sensory Roles of Neuronal Cilia: Cilia Development, Morphogenesis, and Function in C. Elegans

Bae, Y-K, Barr MM.  2008.  

Journal:

Front Biosci

Volume Number:

13

Pages:

5959-5974

Abstract:

In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cilia are found on the dendritic endings of sensory neurons. C. elegans cilia are classified as 'primary' or 'sensory' according to the '9+0' axonemal ultrastructure (nine doublet outer microtubules with no central microtubule pair) and lack of motility, characteristics of '9+2' cilia. The C. elegans ciliated nervous system allows the animal to perceive environmental stimuli and make appropriate developmental, physiological, and behavioral decisions. In vertebrates, the biological significance of primary cilia had been largely neglected. Recent findings have placed primary/sensory cilia in the center of cellular signaling and developmental processes. Studies using genetic model organisms such as C. elegans identified the link between ciliary dysfunction and human ciliopathies. Future studies in the worm will address important basic questions regarding ciliary development, morphogenesis, specialization, and signaling functions.

Citation:
Bae, Y-K, Barr MM.  2008.  Sensory Roles of Neuronal Cilia: Cilia Development, Morphogenesis, and Function in C. Elegans. Front Biosci. 13:5959-5974.